Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Dr. Candace McNaughton’

By Candace McNaughton, ND

There is much discussion around soy and its benefits or risks. The answer is, as always, mixed, as is the research.

Soy contains phytoestrogens, which are compounds that are similar in shape to estrogens (female hormones) in our bodies. These phytoestrogens are partial agonists, meaning they occupy estrogen receptors and activate them weakly while blocking stronger estrogen effects from animal products (who are fed hormones), the body, and xenoestrogens from plastics. This can protect from estrogen-related cancers.

Early puberty in girls (and cancer for that matter) is more strongly linked to animal products than to soy.

As a historical note, “The use of soy in the diet dates back to the Chinese Emperor Shen Nung in 2838 BC. Tofu (a protein-rich curd made from a hot water extract of soybeans) was developed in China and was introduced by Buddhist missionaries to Japan and Korea between the 2nd and 7th centuries.
Tofu was even a revered food of the Chinese Emperors in the Ming to Chin dynasties. Soybeans have been a staple in the diet of Southeast Asians for several centuries.” [1]

Soy has beneficial effects on PMS, menopause, heart health, bone density, and even preventing breast cancer, though there are two studies which indicate soy may not be safe in women who have had breast cancer.

The link to the article below is from a doctor I highly respect and who is the leading naturopath for women’s health in the US. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

By Candace McNaughton, ND

Toxins in the body are eliminated in five main ways:

  • the urine,
  • the bowels,
  • the liver (which sends things to the urine or bowels),
  • the lungs, and
  • the skin.

Elimination through the skin is the reason that one of the most common drug reactions is skin rash.  Sometimes the effect is directly from the drug, and sometimes it is from the body’s reaction to it.

Skin issues can tell us something is wrong inside.  When our hormone balance is off, we can get acne or extra hair growth.  Bumps on the back of the arms can herald low thyroid function or a vitamin A deficiency.  Eczema or psoriasis can be caused by reactions to foods.  Overload of heavy metals can cause skin reactions.  Lung problems can cause the thinner skin areas to become blue.  Unexplained bruising can mean the body is attacking the blood vessels (autoimmune) or the blood is very thin (low platelets).

Read Full Post »

By Candace McNaughton, ND

I am not an alarmist. But this is alarming. Through a subtle messaging campaign, the prescription of opiate medications has increased fourfold in the last ten years. Drug companies like the makers of OxyContin pay groups like the American Pain Foundation much of their annual income. The messaging came from the drug manufacturers through position statements, clinical guidelines, books, and seminars at conferences. Opiates are no longer just being used for severe post-surgical pain or pain associated with cancer or its treatment. They’re being prescribed for chronic pain issues like headaches, low back pain, and fibromyalgia. The gist of the message? Opiates aren’t addictive if used as prescribed, and there’s essentially no limit on dose. So prescribe away.

Except they are addictive. They cause tolerance (needing more to have the same effect) and addiction (going through withdrawal symptoms if you stop them suddenly). I see patients like this in my practice every day. Mothers who tearfully say they can’t take care of their kids while on Oxycodone. Construction workers who can’t work because they can’t drive, let alone operate machinery on the job while on these meds. I see kids who are still in school saying they were given no treatment options other than an opiate script and now they’re still in pain and falling asleep in school and scared of addiction. (more…)

Read Full Post »

By Candace McNaughton, ND

Acid blockers are one of the most prescribed medicines in the world. An article in the British Medical Journal reports on the risk of hip fracture in women who take acid blockers and who smoke. The risk of hip fracture increased by a whopping 50%! This was a survey of almost 80,000 patients over 10 years (from the Nurses Health Study), so the numbers are very likely to reflect the general population. The authors say that the reason is likely because acid blockers and smoking both interfere with calcium absorption. They also showed that taking calcium didn’t seem to help.

If you add on the risk factor of being small-framed, I bet the risk of fracture would be even higher. Acid blockers interfere with the absorption of a number of nutrients such as iron, B12, magnesium, and calcium. This is because the food doesn’t break down completely and because some nutrients (like calcium) are better absorbed in an acidic environment. Yes, that means that milk is a very poor way to get calcium (not to mention it’s not a food group and, and, arrgh!). To protect bone density, you need to start with weight-bearing exercise and take a comprehensive mineral supplement plus vitamin D.

Now the FDA has warned that acid blockers might increase the risk of C difficile-associated diarrhea. C diff is a bug that is usually picked up when people take a lot of antibiotics or from staying in a hospital. Sometimes after treatment, the diarrhea just won’t go away. If you take acid blockers and get C diff (which is on the rise), you are more likely to have chronic recurrent diarrhea that is very difficult to treat.

We need our stomach acid! Acid blockers are most often prescribed for ulcers and acid reflux. Why not make your ulcer go away instead of blocking acid so you don’t notice it’s there? One very important thing that I use for these conditions is chewable licorice extract, or DGL. It not only soothes on contact and is anti-inflammatory, but it also helps the tissue to actually heal. No worries if you’ve heard that licorice can aggravate high blood pressure. The chewable has that component taken out. At Glow we have a really yummy chocolate licorice extract chew. Please let me know if you have any questions.

Read Full Post »

by Candace McNaughton, ND

It is time to separate the stigma of recreational use of marijuana from the benefit of medical use of cannabis.  Many conventional medications (such as opiate pain medications) are harmful, intoxicating, and carry a risk of dependence.  There is so much more to the cannabis plant than the intoxicating properties of THC.

Naturopathic physicians in Washington State can authorize their patients to use cannabis to treat certain conditions which are debilitating or terminal.  This includes cancer, HIV, multiple sclerosis, and epilepsy. It also includes chronic severe pain, glaucoma, Crohn’s disease, and hepatitis C if they are unrelieved by standard medical treatments.  Diseases which result in nausea, vomiting, wasting, appetite loss, cramping, seizures, muscle spasms, when these symptoms are unrelieved by standard treatments, may also benefit from the medical use of cannabis.

I am familiar with medical cannabis law and naturopathic physicians’ role in the legal recommendation of its use.  I am becoming increasingly convinced that not only is it good medicine, but NDs are the most qualified to understand it as medicine, in that botanicals are much more complex than pharmaceuticals.  Botanicals contain hundreds to thousands of chemicals, where pharmaceuticals contain just one.  I use the word medical cannabis rather than medical marijuana because that is the scientific name.  We refer to our medicines by scientific names to avoid the confusion that can arise with many common herb names.

I do not write authorizations for conditions that do not clearly fall under the law.  I do not believe in making many brief appointments with patients simply to fit many in one day.  I only authorize qualifying patients of mine to use medical cannabis after a complete understanding of their medical record and condition.  This means that they understand and have tried other options.  In accordance with the current law, I do not advise patients to buy the medicine, only authorize them to use it.

Read Full Post »

Trained as a family practitioner to address acute and chronic conditions, Dr. McNaughton specializes in allergies, autoimmune disease, and digestive issues.  She facilitates healing as a knowledgeable guide and partner, helping her patients make lasting changes and achieve health goals.  Her patients are motivated and are active participants in their healing process.

Dr. McNaughton holds your comprehensive medical record and helps you to coordinate care with other practitioners.  Her treatment approach is to remove obstacles to cure and improve the functioning of the body so that disease cycles are stopped or slowed.  Treatments can also minimize the side effects of medications and improve their effectiveness.  History, labs, and diagnosis are the same as conventional doctors. Therapeutics are natural medicine.

Dr. McNaughton’s patients feel heard and thoroughly cared for.  They feel safe, accepted, and respected, whether they share aspects of alternative lifestyles or “slip-ups” from the treatment plan.  Her patients appreciate finding ways to practically achieve recommendations rather than only following protocols. Instead of simply telling patients what to do, she works with them to plan how they can institute change.

Therapeutics used:

  • Science-based herbal medicine
  • Diet and nutrient therapy
  • Detoxification
  • B12/B Complex injections
  • Antibiotics or hormones if necessary
  • Medical cannabis evaluation

Dr. McNaughton completed her pre-medical education at Hahnemann University in Philadelphia.  While there, she ran a natural health interest group; arranging for a variety of professionals to speak as well as giving several talks.  She graduated from Bastyr University’s naturopathic medicine program in 2003.

Dr. McNaughton is an experienced writer and speaker, giving talks at libraries, schools, community centers, support groups, and natural foods markets.  She published a front page article on acid/alkaline balance in the PCC Sound Consumer.  She spoke on natural medicine quick fixes at IgniteSeattle, a fast-paced event where speakers are given five minutes and auto-advancing slides.  She has been a member of the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians since 1998, and spoke at their 2005 convention.  She has twice appeared on SCAN TV’s Being in Seattle with Rosemary Broccoli, and on KYPT Radio’s Northwest Point of View with Anita Mofitt.

In 2009, Dr. McNaughton completed a three-week academic and practical intensive in traditional and institutional medicine with Spanish immersion in Cuernavaca, Mexico.  She has facilitated a Spanish conversational group since 2005.  Her personal interests include yoga, hiking, and travel.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: