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Posts Tagged ‘Glow Natural Health’

Join us in spreading the word. Glow is now accepting donations for our Silent Auction, which will be held Dec. 5th at Glow in support of our building manager Alfred Edwards who is suffering from Stage 4 Lymphoma.


We’d love to add to the variety of items we already have to bid on. Examples of things that have been donated so far include original photography and art, cider from Tieton Ciderworks, Washington wine from Amaurice Cellars,  Artisan jewelry, award-winning games from Wonderforge, pet supplies from All the Best Pet Care, and Yasou’s Chi Soup just to name a few. Of course an incredible package will be offered from Glow. Keep an eye out for our newest Spa, Skin care and Waxing services. We will have a beautiful handmade quilt to raffle as well (thanks to Dr. Heather Bergfors, our Chiropractor and Kim Lewis, acupuncturist and front desk person at Glow).

To donate call Glow at (206) 568-7545.

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If you live, work, or shop in Madison Valley, you’ve probably seen him. He is unassuming, polite and hardworking. He’s our building manager, and he has Stage 4 lymphoma.

Alfred Edwards has been taking care of our building on the corner or East Madison Street and Martin Luther King Jr. Way East for four years.

I remember what it was like before he came: it was unkempt at best. From the minute he arrived, he has been working diligently; cleaning toilets, washing the stairwells, leaf blowing — anything that needed to be done, he did it.

He continues to walk female employees from the building to their cars at night, get spit on by homeless people sleeping in the garage and takes care of everything — all without a complaint. In fact, he always has a kind word and expresses his gratitude for the job that he has been given.

Alfred is the primary provider for his girlfriend and their family of four children. He takes care of three buildings a day for our landlord. His life hasn’t been easy. When asked about his cancer diagnosis, he responded, “I’ve been shot, I’ve been hung, I’ve been stabbed — I’ll get through it.” (more…)

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By Candace McNaughton, ND

Sometimes when research is summarized to one sentence, the message is skewed.  The US Preventative Services Task Force has issued a draft statement saying that vitamin D and calcium should not be taken by healthy men or post-menopausal women to reduce fractures and that it may not prevent cancer.[1]  The evidence is mixed and many-layered, but because we are trained for take-home messages and sound bites, many will simply conclude “Don’t take vitamin D or calcium.”

Actually, they say that they can’t recommend for or against it.  More specifically, they say that 400 IU of vitamin D3 and 1000 mg of calcium carbonate don’t reduce osteoporotic fractures in men or postmenopausal women living at home as much as those living in facilities.  However, the risk is reduced in those living at home.  I think the difference could be because of missed doses. Although D3 is considered to be the active form, some studies use D2. Also, 400 IU of D3 is not a very high dose.  Calcium carbonate is the poorest absorbed form of calcium.  Bone density is best supported with a combination of well-absorbed calcium, vitamin D3, vitamin K, other minerals such as strontium and boron, and weight-bearing exercise. The task force reviewed 19 randomized trials and 28 observational studies (for cancer outcomes).  There are close to 18,000 studies that focus on vitamin D.

The task force reports that there is evidence of decreased risk of cancer, but found some evidence that high blood levels may be associated with an increased risk of cancer. A simple, inexpensive blood test that we commonly run here at Glow can make sure your blood levels don’t get too high. However, there is some evidence that higher blood levels may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer.

There is clear evidence that people with low blood levels of vitamin D have increased risk of heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, and diabetes.  Further, some studies show that supplementing with vitamin D reduces risk for heart disease and diabetes, while some don’t.  The blanket conclusion from that research is “vitamin D does not prevent heart disease or diabetes”. I am not sure the answer is that simple.

Auto-immune disorders such as hypothyroidism or multiple sclerosis are skyrocketing in this country. Auto-immune disease-related deaths come only third to heart disease and cancer.[2]  Many diseases, such as heart disease and diabetes, are mediated by inflammation.  Vitamin D reduces auto-immunity and inflammation.[3]  A deficiency turns up auto-immunity and inflammation. (more…)

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We would like to announce Derek’s return to Glow. He’s been gone since early May studying abroad in China. Derek graduates from Bastyr’s doctoral program in integrative oncology and pain management June 18th. His first day back at the office will be Saturday, July 2nd. Glow wants to thank Jessica Vargish for her great work while Derek was gone. She has been a great asset to the organization.

Please give the office a call to schedule an appointment with Derek. His new office hours will be Tuesday through Saturday.

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by Lindsey Lawson MS EAMP, Acupuncturist and Chinese Herbalist

I love cupping. It is useful for both  diagnosis and treatment of various conditions. Western conditions that can benefit from cupping include respiratory issues (chest congestion, asthma, and cough), pain conditions (acute and chronic neck and back pain, headaches), menstrual irregularities (PMS, cramping),stress (including sleep issues and tension,) and some gastrointestinal issues.

As an acupuncturist at Glow, I’ve been trained in the Eastern art of diagnosis according to the patients symptoms. For instance, the Oriental medical condition cupping treats is stasis or stasis with heat. This means that it is effective is treating any conditions with fixed stabbing type pain (vs. diffuse, achy pain which is better with pressure.)

Cupping is a suction technique which creates pumping action inside the muscle by drawing blood to the surface and allowing new blood to flow into the muscle to allow repair and healing. It’s kind of like a reverse massage.This can either be done using a lit cotton ball to create a vacuum (called fire cupping) or with specialized cups  that allow air to be pumped out (called air cupping.)It leaves round “hickies “ on the back which can be purple, red or dark-colored. The color and duration of the marks  indicates the amount of stasis or heat in the body. The more stagnation (or stasis) that is present, the more purple the marks. The more heat that is present the redder the marks.

Cupping is usually done on the back but can be done anywhere that suction can be created. For contradictions as well as a history of cupping see this article in Acupuncture Today.

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